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What book are you reading?


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#1 Alice

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 03:41 PM

Do MBMBers read books? wink.gif Let's discuss them.

At the moment I'm reading "All men are mortal" by Simone de Beauvoir. Is anyone familiar? She was Sartre's wife.

Anyway, very good book so far. I recommend it to those interested in existencialism.


living is easy with eyes closed.

#2 Phillip

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 03:51 PM

I just finished reading The Outsider by Colin Wilson, which I read because it's Christian Bale's favorite book.
Also, I just read an amazing book The Meaning of the 21st Century: An Urgent Plan for Ensuring Our Future, which I would recommend to just about anyone.

#3 chrisg

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 04:17 PM

I recently finished Escape from Lucania (An Epic Story of Survival) written by (as told to) David Roberts.

It's not just a mountaineering story. It's really about what obstacles we can overcome despite incredibly difficult odds.

People can change anything they want to; and that means everything in the world...

...It's time to take humanity back into the center of the ring and follow that for a time...

...Without people, you're nothing.

Joe Strummer

#4 br0ken_leaf

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 04:39 PM

I just started reading Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks it tells of a man called Stephen Wraysford at different stages of his life both before and during World War I. Birdsong is part of a trilogy of novels by Sebastian Faulks which includes The Girl at the Lion d'Or and Charlotte Gray which are all linked through location, history and several minor characters
Life is what happens while you're making plans but all that you need is right here in your hands

#5 SouthernRockhopperPenguin

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 05:51 PM

I have been too busy with exams lately to read anything for myself, but as of next week I will start reading HG Wells' The Island of Dr Moreau and Orhan Pamuk's The Black Book.

#6 Alice

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 08:44 PM

QUOTE(Phillip @ Nov 7 2007, 01:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Also, I just read an amazing book The Meaning of the 21st Century: An Urgent Plan for Ensuring Our Future, which I would recommend to just about anyone.


That sounds interesting, would you care to tell me what it's about? Global warming? Who's the author?

Thanks!


living is easy with eyes closed.

#7 Phillip

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 09:31 PM

QUOTE(Alice @ Nov 7 2007, 03:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That sounds interesting, would you care to tell me what it's about? Global warming? Who's the author?

Thanks!


It explains what the earth could be like if we keep doing what we're doing, what we have to worry about, what we can do to help and change the course. It covers politics, economics, religion, technology, culture, and the environment to help fight things like poverty, war, terrorism, disease, and more. There's lots of stuff in it that I never even thought about before.

http://www.amazon.co...y...0345&sr=8-1

#8 Scott W

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 09:54 PM

Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond. Its a great book. He basically comes up with a unified explanation of why the history of modern humans (from as far back as the african migration) played out as it did based on biogeography. Extremely compelling, interesting, and (IMO) easy to read.

Ive also been devouring Vonnegut books by the dozen since I discovered him about a year ago. Basically any time I go into a bookstore, I check for a vonnegut I dont already own. So far Ive read: Slaughterhouse Five, Cats Cradle, Breakfast of Champions, Slapstick, God Bless you Dr Kevorkian, galapagos, sirens of titan, and welcome to the monkey house. I have a bunch waiting to be read as well.


And though Im no Olivier, If he fought Sugar Ray
He would say, That the thing aint the ring, its the play
So give me a stage, Where this bull here can rage
And though I can fight, Id much rather recite
Thats entertainment

#9 PsychicPsycho

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 02:38 AM

Just started reading the last Harry Potter book. Man, it's been so long since I read the last one, so I'm not getting half the allusions Rowling makes throughout the book. God, and I hate how it started. Because I can totally see Rowling sitting in front of her computer wondering "Gee, how many characters can I kill off in one scene and still write a 3000 page book?"

Very Thomas Hardy-esque.

#10 Tiffany

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 04:00 AM

'A Hundred Years of Solitude' by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. This is my third attempt, and I am determined to finish it. I am about 50 pages until the end!! however, i have been reading it during this whole semester, so i have definitely forgotten what has happened. additionally, the characters are already very confusing to begin with...

i might be starting 'the beach' by alex garland soon. i read the first few chapters for a geography class i'm taking, and i thought it was rather interesting. plus, i am going to thailand later this week, so it will be my reading a book related to where i am going to type of thing (even though i'm planning to go to any beaches).

oh and 'investments' textbook because i have an exam tomorrow sad.gif
just a flickring


#11 terriblestorm

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 07:22 PM

Sense Working Overtime by Naomi Nash. My reading style is really just anything random I pull off the shelf at the library, haha. I read so many books I almost always forget about the ones I read, unless they're really good.
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06/21/08- Detroit, MI

box after box and you're still by my side, the weather is changing and breaking my stride...

#12 LolaGuitar

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 07:40 PM

QUOTE(PsychicPsycho @ Nov 10 2007, 09:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
God, and I hate how it started. Because I can totally see Rowling sitting in front of her computer wondering "Gee, how many characters can I kill off in one scene and still write a 3000 page book?"


Well, you know, it IS a war we're talking about here. Not a Disney fantasy war, but like, an actual war between the forces of good and evil. If none of the good guys died, it wouldn't seem like a real war with real consequences.
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#13 Alice

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 11:51 PM

QUOTE(Scott W @ Nov 10 2007, 07:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond. Its a great book. He basically comes up with a unified explanation of why the history of modern humans (from as far back as the african migration) played out as it did based on biogeography. Extremely compelling, interesting, and (IMO) easy to read.


Wow, that totally sounds like something I would love to read. Will put it on my wishlist!


I looked up Vonnegut: "Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (November 11, 1922 April 11, 2007) (pronounced /ˈvɒnəgət/) was an American novelist known for works blending satire, black comedy, and science fiction"

Wow, I will definitely check him out. Satire, black comedy, and science fiction are exactely my taste. tongue.gif


living is easy with eyes closed.

#14 Raaaandom

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 11:54 PM

Girl Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen. I loved the film and as the books are normally better than the films i thought i'd give it a go.



#15 PsychicPsycho

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 01:24 AM

QUOTE(LolaGuitar @ Nov 11 2007, 11:40 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Well, you know, it IS a war we're talking about here. Not a Disney fantasy war, but like, an actual war between the forces of good and evil. If none of the good guys died, it wouldn't seem like a real war with real consequences.


Yeah, but there is an unwritten rule of which characters you can't kill in books/films. And if you do break the rule, it's a good idea to do it consistently so it doesnt sound like the author/writer is shifting tone just for the shock factor. Because truthfully, that's what it seems like.

Joss Whedon does this well. If you know him and his works, we KNOW some key character is going to die and we expect it, but it is so sudden and it shocks you. But in Rowling's last book (the first half, anyway), it's too forced.

SPOILER:























Okay, so Hedwig dies. And Harry gets all sad for a couple of chapters and she is never mentioned again. How can he ever forget his companion pet that he'd kept for 6/7 years? I don't mean to be sinister, but I don't think Rowling makes the characters suffer as much as they should after Moody died. Although I think Rowling might make him come back towards the end. Just because he was a kickass character.

I'm right at the part where Ron leaves Harry and Hermione at that camp, and I laud Rowling for FINALLY having some character development for Ron and Hermione. That those two characters never really changed until now really bothered me.

I dunno. Maybe I'll like the ending. Because I've been hearing mixed reviews. Some people loved the epilogue and some people hated it. Meh.


O....k..... I think I rambled enough.

#16 terriblestorm

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 01:52 AM

QUOTE(PsychicPsycho @ Nov 11 2007, 08:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yeah, but there is an unwritten rule of which characters you can't kill in books/films. And if you do break the rule, it's a good idea to do it consistently so it doesnt sound like the author/writer is shifting tone just for the shock factor. Because truthfully, that's what it seems like.

Joss Whedon does this well. If you know him and his works, we KNOW some key character is going to die and we expect it, but it is so sudden and it shocks you. But in Rowling's last book (the first half, anyway), it's too forced.

SPOILER:
Okay, so Hedwig dies. And Harry gets all sad for a couple of chapters and she is never mentioned again. How can he ever forget his companion pet that he'd kept for 6/7 years? .

Because nobody wants thirty chapters about an owl, and Harry has much more suffering to keep him busy.

I liked the 7th book. The 5th book will always be my favourite but I was satisfied with the way the series ended.
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box after box and you're still by my side, the weather is changing and breaking my stride...

#17 PsychicPsycho

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 04:06 AM

I didn't mean thrity chapters. Geez, talk about stretching my point there. She could've put little snippets. Like once in Harry's dream in that tent after they escaped from the Ministry. Just to remind the readers "Hey, Hedwig died." I personally think she could've made the readers feel more for Harry and she just couldn't pull it off. I just think Hedwig deserved more than KABOOM for a death scene. My opinion.

But essentially, half the book is dedicated to Harry going somewhere, realizing it's unsafe, and getting out. OVer and over and over and over. I can see how that's appropriate, but it got me bored at a point.

I liked the fourth book, because it was memorable. The whole Triwizard Tournament stuff was really well-done. 5th and 6th kind of seemed like fillers. There werent really anything memorable in those books aside the whole thing with the glass balls and Sirius dying (which made me really upset because he was so badass).

I dunno. I kind of wish Rowling went supercheesy with the last book and brought Sirius, Dumbledore, Moody, Harry's parents, and Hedwig back from the dead. And Harry'd get back together with Ginny and Ron would start going out with Hermione and the whole wizarding world to have a Lord of the Rings-type battle with Volde and his crew and win. Just so I'd feel all happy.



#18 Scott W

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 05:22 AM

QUOTE(Alice @ Nov 11 2007, 05:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wow, that totally sounds like something I would love to read. Will put it on my wishlist!
I looked up Vonnegut: "Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (November 11, 1922 April 11, 2007) (pronounced /ˈvɒnəgət/) was an American novelist known for works blending satire, black comedy, and science fiction"

Wow, I will definitely check him out. Satire, black comedy, and science fiction are exactely my taste. tongue.gif

Vonnegut's work is incredible...its like nothing ive ever read before. And the man himself was amazingly funny. His death really affected me. He said this in an interview a few months before his death:

(On retiring from writing): "Look Im old. Joe Namath isnt passing footballs in the crowd anymore. You should see mozart by now. Im old for God's sake. Im terribly tired."


And though Im no Olivier, If he fought Sugar Ray
He would say, That the thing aint the ring, its the play
So give me a stage, Where this bull here can rage
And though I can fight, Id much rather recite
Thats entertainment

#19 PsychicPsycho

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 05:35 AM

I have definitely heard of Vonnegut, but I'm not sure if I read his works..... but I faintly remember reading SOMETHING on him or something he wrote.....

#20 Karina

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 08:56 AM

Slaughterhouse-Five is one of my favorites books smile.gif

I'm currently reading several books. I'm re-reading Catch-22 (also one of my favorites) for one of my classes. Also, I'm reading Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi. So far, so good. I've been reading LOTR: FOTR since the summer. It's my fourth time trying to read this book and I'm stuck on it again. It's quite boring, but I'm determined to read the LOTR books. Then, I have 4-5 other books I have for classes. Reading is basically my life.
Yay for Alaskans!




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